Chaudhary Kennel

All Dog Breeds >>Komondor

The Komondor is known for his dignity, bravery, and strength. Originally bred to guard livestock, he is territorial and very protective of his family, home, and possessions. He will instinctively guard you, your family, and your belongings. His size and presence alone might be enough to thwart evildoers. He is calm and steady when things are normal, but if he senses danger, he springs into action and defends his charge. The Komondor is reserved and serious with strangers. However, once you properly introduce him to someone new, he will welcome that person into his charge. Komondorok are known to remember and enthusiastically greet people they haven't seen in years. Early socialization is important with this breed because an unsocialized Komondor may become aggressive toward new people. Because of his size, power, and surprising speed, a Komondor owner will need to have his or her dog under control. An out of control Komondor is a serious liability. Obedience training is a must with this breed. They are slow to mature and don't fully do so until about three years of age. They are intelligent and love to learn new things, but they are not blindly obedient, as they don't like to perform tasks they don't see the point of. While they are a willful breed, they are also usually eager to please ... except on the recall. They will come back to you when they've finished doing whatever they are doing. Komondorok are extremely loving and affectionate toward their families. He is intensely loyal and wants to be with his loved ones at all times. He enjoys close physical contact. A lonely Komondor is miserable. If members of his family are away, he often lies by the door waiting for their return. He is gentle with and protective of children. Komondorok can be very lazy couch potatoes and will sleep for hours, but they still need daily exercise and love to go for long, leisurely walks. There is a range of personalities within the breed but most Komondorok, in healthy, loving homes, are trustworthy, vigilant, hardy, and devoted dogs.
Character

The Komondor is not recommended for most families, unless they have been socialized since puppy hood to the same family and thoroughly trained. This is a serious and commanding breed, and can be aggressive against dogs as well as people. Therefore they need obedience training from an early age. They are smart, and therefore easily bored They also have a long memory, and if they are allowed to get away with bad behavior once, they will continue to exhibit that behavior. They are loyal to their master, and fiercely protective against anyone whom they consider a threat to their charges.

Weight

88-133 pounds

General Health

If well cared for, a Komondor will live about 12 years. Like most large doors, they are subject to hip dysplasia, but this does not affect very many of them. Bloat can be a problem. As far as eye diseases, entropion (the curling inwards of either the upper or lower eyelid) is a genetic disease, but can be surgically repaired. Juvenile cataracts can also be a problem. If the coat is not properly cared for, they are prone to skin problems. With such a long coat, checking for external parasites while grooming is a much.

History

The origin of the Komondor is uncertain. The theory is that they are descendants of the Russian Owtcharka, brought into what is now Hungary by invading Magyars several centuries ago, where it flourished as a sheep herding dog. The Komondor was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1937, however World War II almost wiped out the breed. After the war, breeding was very slowly re-established over a period of fifteen years. It was not until 1962 that exportation of Komondors to America and other countries resumed. However, it is not a dog that is bred in large quantities.

Maintenance

It is important to clean the ears of the Komondor on a regular basis, as well as the pads of its feet. Only the puppies shed, before their cords (or "dreadlocks") form. Although combing out the dreadlocks is not necessary, you must keep them separated, otherwise they will become matted. You should "work" on these cords every week. Have a groomer show you how to do it.

Komodors should not be brushed as puppies. Brushing while they are young will ruin its hair follicle and its hair will not cord as they age.

Ideal Environment

Because the Komondor is a rather lazy dog, and will sleep a great deal, it will do okay in an apartment, as long as it gets enough exercise. However, like all large dogs in will do best in a country environment, or at least in a home with a large yard. They do well in most climates.

Boredom will be a serious problem in a cramped environment. This is a working breed and if they are not given a job, they may develop behavior problems that could be avoided. They do not do well in kennels and may become anxious if not properly exercised.

 

Know More....

The Komondor is known for his dignity, bravery, and strength. Originally bred to guard livestock, he is territorial and very protective of his family, home, and possessions. He will instinctively guard you, your family, and your belongings. His size and presence alone might be enough to thwart evildoers. He is calm and steady when things are normal, but if he senses danger, he springs into action and defends his charge. The Komondor is reserved and serious with strangers. However, once you properly introduce him to someone new, he will welcome that person into his charge. Komondorok are known to remember and enthusiastically greet people they haven't seen in years. Early socialization is important with this breed because an unsocialized Komondor may become aggressive toward new people. Because of his size, power, and surprising speed, a Komondor owner will need to have his or her dog under control. An out of control Komondor is a serious liability. Obedience training is a must with this breed. They are slow to mature and don't fully do so until about three years of age. They are intelligent and love to learn new things, but they are not blindly obedient, as they don't like to perform tasks they don't see the point of. While they are a willful breed, they are also usually eager to please ... except on the recall. They will come back to you when they've finished doing whatever they are doing. Komondorok are extremely loving and affectionate toward their families. He is intensely loyal and wants to be with his loved ones at all times. He enjoys close physical contact. A lonely Komondor is miserable. If members of his family are away, he often lies by the door waiting for their return. He is gentle with and protective of children. Komondorok can be very lazy couch potatoes and will sleep for hours, but they still need daily exercise and love to go for long, leisurely walks. There is a range of personalities within the breed but most Komondorok, in healthy, loving homes, are trustworthy, vigilant, hardy, and devoted dogs.

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